Contact

Bret M. Webb, Ph.D., P.E., D.CE
Professor
University of South Alabama
150 Jaguar Drive, SH3142
Mobile, AL 36688 USA
Phone: (251) 460-6174
Fax: (251) 461-1400
Email: bwebb@southalabama.edu

Research Positions

Currently seeking an MSCE student to perform research on groundwater impacts to coastal lagoons. A research assistantship is available. Contact me for more details.

Current Research Assistants

SE Students
Garland Pennison

 

MSCE Students
Patrick Hautau
Marshall Hayden
Kate Haynes
Jackie Wittmann

 

Undergraduate Students
Derek Kelly

Former Students

MSCE Students
Bryan Groza (2016)
Kari Servold (2015)
Chris Marr (2013)
Richard Allen (2013)
Miyuki Matthews (2012)

 

Post Docs
Jon Risinger
Jungwoo Lee

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living shorelines

FHWA GI Pilot title slide... click for animation

We are wrapping up a one-year collaborative project between USA, the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT), and the US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration (USDOT FHWA).  This was one of five pilot projects funded by USDOT FHWA to evaluate the use of green infrastructure for improving the resilience of coastal transportation systems. The pilot projects are an initial step in a more comprehensive effort by USDOT FHWA to develop an implementation guide for nature-based solutions that improve resilience. More information about that project is found at the following link {click here}.

 

Our pilot project with MDOT was focused on improving the resilience of a coastal bridge in Mississippi to hurricane hazards and future sea level rise. More specifically, our green infrastructure approach was designed to address the vulnerability of bridge approaches and low-elevation bridge spans. The causes of damage to the bridge during Katrina were determined through the use of hydrodynamic models. A hindcast simulation of Katrina was performed using the coupled ADCIRC+SWAN models. Those results were extracted and used to force a high-resolution, two-dimensional simulation using the XBeach model. An animation of some of those results is provided below.

 

To that end, a pair of vegetated berms were designed in order to mitigate storm damage now and in the future during extreme events.

 

An overview of the entire pilot project is available in a recorded webinar at the following link {click here for webinar}. Ours is the second presentation in the webinar recording (at about the 25-minute mark). Webinar recordings for all five pilot projects, as well as other presentations in an ongoing USDOT FHWA resilience series, can be found at the following link {click here for all webinars}. A brief animation of our presentation slides is available by clicking on the title slide image in this post.

 

Katrina Hindcast using XBeach, forced with ADCIRC+SWAN output…

XBeach animation

Hindcast of Katrina using XBeach: Terrain elevation contour colors correspond to the lower blue-green-brown-white color scale. Selected bathymetric contours are shown as dashed white lines on the surface. The animated water surface is contoured by significant wave height using the blue-white-red scale. Vectors represent the depth-averaged flow magnitude and direction, but only at every 1/10th grid cell for clarity.

 

Title slide image for ASBPA 2017 presentation

I recently presented the results of a year-long research project on synthesizing the capacity of natural and nature-based features (NNBF) to reduce coastal storm hazards. The presentation was given in the Living Shorelines session at ASPA 2017 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in October. The project, and presentation, were a collaboration between researchers at USA, the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Northeastern University, the City College of New York, and the US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center who funded the project.

 

More than 200 published research papers were identified, evaluated, and synthesized in this work. The synthesis focuses on the ability of marshes, mangroves, maritime forests, seagrasses, reefs, beaches, and dunes to attenuate waves, storm surge, flooding, and erosion. With very few exceptions, the literature does not contain unified methods for analyzing and describing these capabilities, and the range of values describing their performance is broad. Regardless of the uncertainty in published values, there is literature that supports the capacity of each of the NNBF considered to provide some measurable reduction of coastal storm hazards. A logical next step is to perform a detailed meta-analysis on values reported in these publications in order to determine average performance values and characterizations of their uncertainty.

 

A short animation of the presentation can be viewed by clicking on the title slide shown here. Please contact me for a full copy of the presentation.

 

Dog RIver Park

Dog River Park: Mobile, AL

Some of the usual suspects in Alabama and Mississippi have been busy developing technical guidance on living shorelines. What’s different about these new documents is that they are aimed at property owners and contractors instead of practitioners, scientists, engineers, etc. Our goal, as a community of living shorelines practitioners, has been to push some of our knowledge down to these underserved groups in hopes that they might make use of our regional general permits for living shorelines in Alabama and Mississippi.

Well after a couple of years of hard work (and some delays), I’m happy to say that they are finally available. Please click on the links below to download the PDFs. These projects involved too many friends and agencies to list here in this post, so please be sure to review the acknowledgments in each document. However, I would like to express our collective gratitude to the primary funding agencies (NOAA and GOMA) as well as the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program and the Southern Environmental Law Center for their support and hard work.

 

Living Shorelines: A Guide for Alabama Property Owners

 

Living Shorelines: A Technical Guide for Contractors in Alabama and Mississippi.

 

{Edit: Fixed a problem with the links. The documents should load in the same browser window/tab now without trying to open a new one. Apologies for the troubles.}

 

Interested in living shorelines? Want to learn more? Please watch and listen to this video provided by Restore America’s Estuaries…

 

 

 

rae-logo-transparent

 

This year’s National Summit on Coastal & Estuarine Restoration, co-sponsored by Restore America’s Estuaries and the The Coastal Society, was held at the Gaylord National in Washington, DC. There was a definite focus on living shorelines at the meeting: dedicated sessions on the topic were available throughout the conference schedule… and you didn’t even have to change rooms!

 

The University of South Alabama provided three presentations in the living shorelines category at this year’s meeting. Dr. Scott Douglass lead us off on Monday, his graduate student Kari Servold provided a retrospective on Tuesday, and I wrapped things up in the last session of the conference on Wednesday. The citations are listed below.

 

  • Douglass, S. L., Webb, B. M., and Servold, K. (2014). A primer on coastal engineering for “living shorelines.” 7th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration, Washington, DC. Nov 1 – 6.
  • Servold, K., Douglass, S. L., and Prado, B. (2014). Ten years later – a retrospective investigation of design elements used to develop successful living shorelines in Alabama. 7th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration, Washington, DC. Nov 1 – 6.
  • Webb, B. M., Douglass, S. L., and Herder, T. (2014). Community-based restoration: a living shoreline for Mon Louis Island, Alabama. 7th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration, Washington, DC. Nov 1 – 6.